Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Trade Marketing as a Source of Competitive Advantage - 825 Words

Trade Marketing as a Source of Competitive Advantage (Essay Sample) Content: Trade Marketing as a Source of Competitive Advantage(Dissertation Methodology)Authorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s NameInstitutional AffiliationTrade Marketing as a Source of Competitive Advantage(Dissertation Methodology)4.1. Conceptual ModelThe degree of a realized analytics technology with the synergy in a context of the trade marketing management ultimately depends on the merging of capabilities. First, is the ability to collect data, followed by the ability to derive knowledge from the information that has been collected and lastly, the extent of the usage of the analytics in trade marketing. Basing on the approach outlined in the in chapter two, a compatibility of the analytics with the organization usually influences the extent of a synergy that is realized from the analytical initiative. The compatibility is the concept that is aggregated, which mirrors the degree of fit between the analytics and every other complementary resources of the organization. On the different point, t he compatibility that is low would result into time lag deployments of the analytical innovations that would impact negatively on the speed as well as on the costs of innovation. According to Davies (2010), it is worth to remember that trade can be defined as the discipline of marketing, which is related to the increasing the demand for the level of the distributor, the retailer or the wholesaler rather than at the level of the consumer. However, it is usually a fact that there is also a need to continue with the strategies of brand management so as to sustain the need at the end of the consumers (Barney Hesterly, 2012). As such, the following hypotheses can be elucidated basing on this reasoning; 1 The more the capability of the trade marketing, the greater competitive advantage can be attained. 2 The lesser the compatibility between the trade marketing and the complementary resources, the lower the trade marketing capability.More so, the complementary resources may also function as a barrier to the erosion of the achieved competitive advantage.4.2. The Methodology of Research4.2. 1. Motivation of the Mixed ApproachThe study employees a couple of research methods: the approach of an explanatory case study and the approach of quantitative analysis that is conducted through a survey. The case study is employed to add some portion to the organizational knowledge that is related to phenomena, where the boundaries cannot be vividly defined, and the perspective is inappropriately developed as well. Additionally, the phenomena can only be viewed in the natural settings and hence, the evidence is gathered in the natural surroundings. Furthermore, a case study is a method that is recognized in the study of business. A survey data on the trade marketing practices was applied to attain the method triangulation that enhances generalizability and the validity of the study findings because robust source triangulation of evidence was impossible to hold. The case study, as well as the survey, was carried out in MTN Nigeria but there is no any risk that there was communication with the same respondents during the survey and the case studies (Goodluck, 2011).Not all the findings of the case study can be statistically checked. Therefore, it is worth to note that one of the case study research critiques is that it offers a base for the scientific generalization. The case studies are generalizable to the theoretical propositions, but not to the population. The core objective of the case study is the analytical generalization rather than the statistical generalization (Kumar, 2005). As such, that was among the reasons carrying out an extensive literature research and identifying the propositions up front.4.3. The Case StudyThe selection criteria for the caseThe case aimed at the empirical investigation of trade marketing contribution to the attainment of the competitive advantage. Additionally, the barriers to the erosion of the achieved advantage are studi ed for each case as well. The cases were selected under the following criteria; * The company should be willing to take part in the research * The case must be in the industry of service * The firm must have presence in NigeriaThe components of case study designThe components that can be used in the design of the case study include the unit of analysis, the hypotheses/propositions and the research question. An organization is the core unit of analysis of the study. However, the technology also impacts on the processes of the business and as such, it is also considered. The impact of technology is also covered and its implications on the firmà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s competitive advantage as well (Kotler Armstrong, 2012). The research question was determined in the first chapter while the hypotheses stemmed from the analysis of the relevant theory. Additionally, the interview guide was developed to collect data. Although interviews provide sufficient data in just a short while, they are costly i n terms of time and efforts required to analyze the results. The within-case analysis was conducted after gathering data so as to understand the context of every case distinctively as a standalone entity (Ketchen, 2006). The next step was the cross-case analysis that assists in determining the similarities and differences between cases so as to draw conclusions.4.4. Quantitative StudyThe survey is conducted to investigate the relationship between the trade marketing and the competitive advantage. However, Newman Benz (2010) asserts that it is impossible to link the research framework to the survey data directly and such, it is essential to judge the quality of research validity and reliability, where validity is the extent to which the research mirrors the chosen research problem. On the other hand, reliability is the consistency of the set of measurements and in the survey; the internal consistency was measured by the alpha tests of Cronbach where the construct had a scale that wa s complex.Statistical Methods

Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Essay about Madonna Business Case Analysis - 634 Words

Madonna Business Case Analysis This business case analysis explores the theme of strategy by examining the career of Madonna, the world’s highest earning female entertainer, and one of the most business savvy women in the world . The case analysis identifies the impact that strategy can have on successful performance, and that it can be applied to both individuals as well as organizations. As we see in the example Madonna demonstrates that strategy is not about creating a detailed plan, but about establishing an overall direction that has clear goals, understands the competitive environment, appraises resources, is effectively implemented, and easily adaptable. Synopsis of the Case From Madonnas early days in her career, she has†¦show more content†¦The biggest issue standing in her way was how to obtain her success, and then be able to maintain it instead of fading away like many other celebrities do as they get older. Explanation of Relevant Concepts, Theories and Applications Derived from Course Materials Successful strategies are based on several common elements, such as: 1)Simple, consistent long-term goals 2)Profound understanding of the competitive environment, 3)Objective appraisal of resources, and 4)Effective implementation (Grant, 2010). As our case study shows, Madonna has had a firm grasp on these elements. Her long-term goal to be the greatest female performer is very simplistic and long term. Her understanding of the competitive environment is exceptional, throughout the years she understood exactly the direction that music was taking. In the 1980s she understood that dance clubs and DJs were the future and if she wanted to break into the industry she needed to start there. In the late 1980s and into the 1990s she utilized sex and seduction to keep in publics eye. By the late 2000s she understood that music was going away from the recorded format and the money to made was in live performances. Madonna has understood throughout the years that as the industry was constantly changing that she would need to as well to stay relevant. She has been successful at promoting her strengths, while shadowing her weaknesses. Madonna has developed her image throughout the years toShow MoreRelatedMadonna Case Analysis1334 Words   |  6 PagesMadonna Case Analysis Introduction The following case study covers the foundation of Madonna’s business success and her continued global popularity over the past 20 years. Madonna has influenced people all over the world. Her quest for Superstardom is evident in her wide range of endeavors such as her records, concerts, movies, books, and charity events. She has the skill to market herself as a product while maintaining an edge, yet it is her experiences and sense of the world, art, fashionRead MoreResearch Topic1530 Words   |  7 Pagesscholars have effectively demonstrated, social processes that are culturally and historically relative have a critical role in shaping our lived experiences. This paper will continue to build upon the examination of social construction through a unique analysis of the use of cellular phones by teenage girls that incorporates both the idealization of use presented in advertising images and the lived experiences of teenage girls. The functioning of three primary discourses will be outlined: the media discourseRead MoreEssay Mtv And The Madonna Phenomenon2134 Words   |  9 Pages MTV and The Madonna Phenomenon quot;Madonnas intuitive grasp on the televisual world in which we live- of the mediums possibilities for engaging spectators in diverse ways- that in part accounts for her success. She is the supreme television heroine.quot; (E. Ann Kaplan 271) quot;What are the main theories which we have studied so far and how have they affected how you view television?quot;-This is the question which this paper is supposed to answer. Obviously there is not enough time orRead MoreLouis Vuitton : The World Known Luxury Leather Finally998 Words   |  4 PagesIn 1854, Louis Vuitton Malletier run his own company in Paris (France). That is, as we know, Louis Vuitton (LV). The brand grows into the world-renowned luxury leather finally. According to our case, his success is based on three rules. That is, to master his savoir, to provide excellent service to his customers and to innovate continuously. Besides, in 1987, the company of LV merged with Moet Hennessy that was a company much larger than it to form the Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) group. MoreoverRead MoreTeaching Notes Robert Grant - Strategy 4th Edition51665 Words   |  207 PagesContents Introduction 3 1 Madonna 21 2 Laura Ashley Holdings plc: The Battle for Survival 26 3 The US Airline Industry in 2002 33 4 DaimlerChrysler and the World Automobile Industry 41 5 Wal-Mart Stores Inc., May 2002 49 6 Eastman Kodak: Meeting the Digital Challenge 62 7 Organizational Restructuring within the Royal Dutch/Shell Group 70 8 Harley-Davidson, Inc., January 2001 77 9 Online Broking Strategies: Merrill Lynch, Charles Schwab and E*Trade 83 10 11 12 Emi and the CT ScannerRead MoreLv Marketing Analysis1462 Words   |  6 PagesLouis Vuitton Analysis SWOT; Porter’s; PESTLE Louis Vuitton Analysis SWOT; Porter’s; PESTLE TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction 1 Louis vuitton – the brand # SWOT analysis # Porter’s model # pestle # INTRODUCTION This is a report about the brand named Louis Vuitton in terms of brand analysis on the context of Marketing Lectures. We choose Louis Vuitton because it is an interesting brand to analyze since it is strongly established in the market and has been growing despite the economicRead MoreThe Rise Of E Commerce1440 Words   |  6 Pagesand Shanghai. On 2009 the new store in Beijing of HM was finally opened. So far, HM has opened 14 stores in China (2009. What drives HM to expand in China since 2007 and how the expansion leads HM to change their strategy using PESTEL analysis and SWOT analysis. This paper will evaluate whether HM enter Chinese market is a good choice and whether they have good strategy to deal with the new market. 1.1 Purpose of the study The purpose of this study is to inspect one of the marketing strategyRead MoreZara and HM4540 Words   |  19 PagesCompany presentation p. 3 Generic strategies p. 3 amp; 4 Growth strategies p. 4 amp; 5 Pest analysis p. 5 amp; 6 Value chain p. 6 amp; 7 SWOT analysis p. 7 amp; 8 Price / quality Grid p. 8 Hamp;M Company presentation p. 9 Generic strategies p. 9 Growth strategies p. 10 PEST analysis p. 10 amp; 11 Value chain p. 11 amp; 12 SWOT analysis p. 12 Zara and Hamp;M Comparison of the 4 P’s p. 13 Porters 5 forces p. 14 Comparison of theRead Moretest bank Essay5473 Words   |  22 Pagesshareholders F 1 The basic framework for strategy analysis Strategy definition TF01.07 The role of business strategy can be described as the selection of resources a firm chooses to achieve its long-term goals and the way it organizes those resources into activities T 2 Strategic management today Corporate and business strategy Strategy role TF01.08 The conceptual problem with using SWOT analyses is that most people ignore deep analysis of internal factors and underestimate their own weaknessesRead More Quality Management Essay3956 Words   |  16 Pagesthat are essential in the growth of performance in the field of manufacturing and services in business firms. Effective quality management can underpin organizational success. It is a field that is relatively new and growing market as it developed from the 1920s gradually to the contemporary society. Originating from principles of quality control that were the initial stages of the growth of the business, the idea has given growth to the standards of estimation of management standards like the ISO

Sunday, May 17, 2020

The Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Leadership

Leadership Organization Development Journal Emerald Article: Emotional intelligence and leadership effectiveness Robert Kerr, John Garvin, Norma Heaton, Emily Boyle Article information: To cite this document: Robert Kerr, John Garvin, Norma Heaton, Emily Boyle, (2006),Emotional intelligence and leadership effectiveness, Leadership Organization Development Journal, Vol. 27 Iss: 4 pp. 265 - 279 Permanent link to this document: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/01437730610666028 Downloaded on: 27-10-2012 References: This document contains references to 68 other documents Citations: This document has been cited by 29 other documents To copy this document: permissions@emeraldinsight.com Users who downloaded this Article also†¦show more content†¦However, they also question the conceptual validity of a key branch (managing emotions) of the MSCEIT. Originality/value – Although EI is viewed as a key determinant of effective leadership within leadership literature there is a relative dearth of supporting research that has not used student sample populations or a conceptually suspect model of EI within their research methodology. Keywords Emotional intelligence, Leadership, Management effectiveness, Intelligence tests Paper type Research paper What is emotional intelligence? Salovey and Mayer (1990) ï ¬ rst established the term â€Å"emotional intelligence†(EI). They hypothesized a framework describing a set of skills: . . . relevant to the accurate appraisal and expression of emotion in oneself and in others, the effective regulation of emotion in self and others, and the use of feeling to motivate, plan, and achieve in one’s life (Salovey and Mayer, 1990, p. 185). Thus, they implied that the two distinct mental processes, thinking and feeling, actually work together. Their theory of EI focuses on the extent to which people’s cognitive capabilities are informed by emotions and the extent to which emotions are cognitively managed (George, 2000). Since, Salovey and Mayer’s (1990) conceptualization of EI the ï ¬ eld has become inundated with a deluge of different tests all purporting to be effective assessments of an individual’s EI. The mainShow MoreRelatedThe Impact Of Emotional Intelligence On Leadership999 Words   |  4 PagesThe Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Leadership and Leadership development in the non-profit sector. Gone are the days of intelligence relating only to academia and the testing of the intelligence quotient (IQ). The 21st century brought about the introduction of â€Å"emotional intelligence† as an added skill set in a leader’s tool kit. Essentially, the ability be aware and manage one’s own emotions, the others emotions, and effectively applying that information to guide ones thinking and actionsRead MoreImpact of Emotional Intelligence on Leadership3981 Words   |  16 PagesTHE IMPACT OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE ON LEADERSHIP INTRODUCTION Our World today has more civilized societies with ever expanding population, having diversity in racial polarization, creed and gender. One common thread or feature in all these people is that everyone has feelings and emotions, and emotions engender emotional intelligence. We, being humans, are superior over other living creatures- we can think, feel and rationalize. Because of that we are being deluded by many behaviours, traitsRead MoreEmotional Intelligence : The Impact Vulnerability Has On Leadership Within Nursing Care1520 Words   |  7 PagesEmotional Intelligence: The Impact Vulnerability Has On Leadership within Nursing Care Empathy is used to describe a wide range of experiences. It is the â€Å"capacity† to share and understand other people’s emotions and another’s â€Å"state of mind†. Empathy is being able to imagine what someone else might be thinking or feeling, while maintaining a state of vulnerability to one’s previous experiences, biases, and emotions. Empathy is a very powerful concept that is often misunderstood, or discountedRead MoreHow Leadership Styles Influence On An Organization s Climate Essay1019 Words   |  5 Pages The article of Leadership That Gets Results provides the six leadership styles for individuals to understand how leadership styles influence on an organization’s climate. Furthermore, the six leadership styles are consisted of the emotional intelligence: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and social skill. Therefore, these three concepts, such as the six leadership styles, the elements of emotional intelligen ce, and an organization’s climate, will influence each other because theRead MoreThe Skills And Knowledge I Learned Through The Course1510 Words   |  7 Pagesmany things in leadership such as management vs leadership, emotional intelligence, team stages of development, situational leadership, servant leadership, and Myers-Brigs Personality assessment tool. Also, while taking this course, I also identified my dependable strengths as well as my areas of weakness. At the beginning, I will talk about my personal definition of leadership. Then, I will summarize my self-evaluation/self-assessment by using MBTI, Big 5, and Emotional Intelligence. I will alsoRead MoreEmotional Inelligence Essay examples1669 Words   |  7 Pagesyears emotional intelligence has become one of the hottest topics between organizations. Researches have been working on this topic for time to time, to demonstrate or refute the importance of feelings. In the beginning common thoughts from managers and or supervisors were; emotions are in the way; emotions try to keep us from making good decisions; emotions increase a lack on focusing. Fortunately, an indeed research takes emotional intelligence to an ultimate ideal in which intelligence is basedRead MoreEmotional Intelligence ( Eq )950 Words   |  4 PagesEmotional Intelligence (EQ) can best be described as the ability to identify and manage your own emotions as well as others (Psychology Today). Generically speaking, this definition will suffice, but the more detailed levels of understanding help provide a clearer picture as to what emotional intelligence is. A high level of EQ has a direct correlation with effective leadership because both subjects involve groups of people. Emotional Intelligence can be broken up into five categories, all of whichRead MoreLeadership Styles And Their Preferred Language Of Appreciation1017 Words   |  5 Pagesstewardship of the HR profession. Management leadership is an ongoing responsibility and an art that develops over time. According to the late George Terry (1981), the primary task of a manger is to enable a working environment that will induce and maintain an enthusiastic desire to accomplish work among employees (p. 90). Leadership progresses with experience, observation, and interaction with employees. The critical understanding of leadership is being able to motivate employees to invest theirRead MoreThe Relationship Between Emotional Intelligence And Leadership1232 Words   |  5 Pagesarticles to discuss the relationship between emotional intelligence and leadership. I will discuss the reasoning for the credibility of each source chosen for this paper, summarize interesting information provided by each article, discuss any findings related to the topic, and discuss how the topic will influence my future behaviors. Overview of Credible Sources Before I can start discussing the relationship between emotional intelligence and leadership, I must explain why the three sources used inRead MoreEmotional Intelligence Impact An Employees Communication And Success1329 Words   |  6 Pageswill address how emotional intelligence impacts an employees’ communication and success in an organization. Recognizing, understanding and managing the verbal and non-verbal emotions of themselves and others can positively impact their performance and the organizations. Emotional intelligence could be the missing link from taking an organization from good to great. Emotional Intelligence: The Missing Link The understanding of how individuals with average intellectual intelligence (IQ) could outperform The Impact Of Emotional Intelligence On Leadership The Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Leadership and Leadership development in the non-profit sector. Gone are the days of intelligence relating only to academia and the testing of the intelligence quotient (IQ). The 21st century brought about the introduction of â€Å"emotional intelligence† as an added skill set in a leader’s tool kit. Essentially, the ability be aware and manage one’s own emotions, the others emotions, and effectively applying that information to guide ones thinking and actions (Salovey and Mayer 1990). This type of leader is mindful not to offend, employing an empathetic approach while genuinely using self-discipline and care when interacting with others. According to Goleman (1998) â€Å"Effective leaders are alike in one crucial way: they all have a high degree of emotional intelligence. â€Å" His position is a good leader will know what type of leadership to engage, based on the situation. Leaders in the nonprofit behavioral health arena are expected to work through and connect with diverse groups of people, while demonstrating the skills to actively listen and discern situations empathetically. Affective imagination is the leader with a self-awareness, which effectively responds to intellectual and emotionally challenging situations (Stephenson, 2011). According to Cote Miners (2006) the adaptation of emotional competencies are essential for several domains of life which helps to pique interest in the concept of EI. The relationship of EI has been exploredShow MoreRelatedThe Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Leadership7109 Words   |  29 PagesLeadership Organization Development Journal Emerald Article: Emotional intelligence and leadership effectiveness Robert Kerr, John Garvin, Norma Heaton, Emily Boyle Article information: To cite this document: Robert Kerr, John Garvin, Norma Heaton, Emily Boyle, (2006),Emotional intelligence and leadership effectiveness, Leadership Organization Development Journal, Vol. 27 Iss: 4 pp. 265 - 279 Permanent link to this document: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/01437730610666028 Downloaded on:Read MoreImpact of Emotional Intelligence on Leadership3981 Words   |  16 PagesTHE IMPACT OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE ON LEADERSHIP INTRODUCTION Our World today has more civilized societies with ever expanding population, having diversity in racial polarization, creed and gender. One common thread or feature in all these people is that everyone has feelings and emotions, and emotions engender emotional intelligence. We, being humans, are superior over other living creatures- we can think, feel and rationalize. Because of that we are being deluded by many behaviours, traitsRead MoreEmotional Intelligence : The Impact Vulnerability Has On Leadership Within Nursing Care1520 Words   |  7 PagesEmotional Intelligence: The Impact Vulnerability Has On Leadership within Nursing Care Empathy is used to describe a wide range of experiences. It is the â€Å"capacity† to share and understand other people’s emotions and another’s â€Å"state of mind†. Empathy is being able to imagine what someone else might be thinking or feeling, while maintaining a state of vulnerability to one’s previous experiences, biases, and emotions. Empathy is a very powerful concept that is often misunderstood, or discountedRead MoreHow Leadership Styles Influence On An Organization s Climate Essay1019 Words   |  5 Pages The article of Leadership That Gets Results provides the six leadership styles for individuals to understand how leadership styles influence on an organization’s climate. Furthermore, the six leadership styles are consisted of the emotional intelligence: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and social skill. Therefore, these three concepts, such as the six leadership styles, the elements of emotional intelligen ce, and an organization’s climate, will influence each other because theRead MoreThe Skills And Knowledge I Learned Through The Course1510 Words   |  7 Pagesmany things in leadership such as management vs leadership, emotional intelligence, team stages of development, situational leadership, servant leadership, and Myers-Brigs Personality assessment tool. Also, while taking this course, I also identified my dependable strengths as well as my areas of weakness. At the beginning, I will talk about my personal definition of leadership. Then, I will summarize my self-evaluation/self-assessment by using MBTI, Big 5, and Emotional Intelligence. I will alsoRead MoreEmotional Inelligence Essay examples1669 Words   |  7 Pagesyears emotional intelligence has become one of the hottest topics between organizations. Researches have been working on this topic for time to time, to demonstrate or refute the importance of feelings. In the beginning common thoughts from managers and or supervisors were; emotions are in the way; emotions try to keep us from making good decisions; emotions increase a lack on focusing. Fortunately, an indeed research takes emotional intelligence to an ultimate ideal in which intelligence is basedRead MoreEmotional Intelligence ( Eq )950 Words   |  4 PagesEmotional Intelligence (EQ) can best be described as the ability to identify and manage your own emotions as well as others (Psychology Today). Generically speaking, this definition will suffice, but the more detailed levels of understanding help provide a clearer picture as to what emotional intelligence is. A high level of EQ has a direct correlation with effective leadership because both subjects involve groups of people. Emotional Intelligence can be broken up into five categories, all of whichRead MoreLeadership Styles And Their Preferred Language Of Appreciation1017 Words   |  5 Pagesstewardship of the HR profession. Management leadership is an ongoing responsibility and an art that develops over time. According to the late George Terry (1981), the primary task of a manger is to enable a working environment that will induce and maintain an enthusiastic desire to accomplish work among employees (p. 90). Leadership progresses with experience, observation, and interaction with employees. The critical understanding of leadership is being able to motivate employees to invest theirRead MoreThe Relationship Between Emotional Intelligence And Leadership1232 Words   |  5 Pagesarticles to discuss the relationship between emotional intelligence and leadership. I will discuss the reasoning for the credibility of each source chosen for this paper, summarize interesting information provided by each article, discuss any findings related to the topic, and discuss how the topic will influence my future behaviors. Overview of Credible Sources Before I can start discussing the relationship between emotional intelligence and leadership, I must explain why the three sources used inRead MoreEmotional Intelligence Impact An Employees Communication And Success1329 Words   |  6 Pageswill address how emotional intelligence impacts an employees’ communication and success in an organization. Recognizing, understanding and managing the verbal and non-verbal emotions of themselves and others can positively impact their performance and the organizations. Emotional intelligence could be the missing link from taking an organization from good to great. Emotional Intelligence: The Missing Link The understanding of how individuals with average intellectual intelligence (IQ) could outperform

Friday, May 15, 2020

Science Projects for Every Subject

How many times have you seen a science demonstration or watched a cool video and wished you could do something similar? While having a science lab certainly expands the type of projects you can do, there are many entertaining and fascinating projects you can do using everyday materials found in your own home or classroom. The projects listed here are grouped according to subject, so no matter what youre interested in, youll find an exciting activity. Youll find projects for every age and skill level, generally intended for the home or a basic school lab. To understand the basics of chemical reactions, start with the classic baking soda volcano or get a little more advanced and make your own hydrogen gas. Next,  learn the basics of crystallography with our collection of crystal-related experiments.   For younger students, our bubble-related experiments are simple, safe, and lots of fun. But if youre looking to turn up the heat, explore our collection of fire and smoke experiments.   Because everyone knows science is more fun when you can eat it, try some of our chemistry experiments involving food. And finally, our  weather-related experiments  are perfect for amateur meteorologists any  time of the year.   Turn a Science Project Into a Science Experiment While science projects may be done simply because they are fun and raise interest in a subject, you can use them as the basis for experiments. An experiment is a part of the scientific method. The scientific method, in turn, is a step-by-step process used to ask and answer questions about the natural world. To apply the scientific method, follow these steps: Make observations: Whether youre aware of it or not, you always know something about a subject before you perform a project or experiment with it. Sometimes observations take the form of background research. Sometimes they are qualities of a subject you notice. Its a good idea to keep a notebook to record your experiences before a project. Make notes of anything of interest to you.Propose a hypothesis: Think of a hypothesis in the form of cause and effect. If you take an action, what do you think the effect will be? For the projects in this list, think what might happen if you change the amounts of ingredients or substitute one material for another.Design and perform an experiment: An experiment is a way to test a hypothesis. Example: Do all brands of paper towels pick up the same amount of water? An experiment might be to measure the amount of liquid picked up by different paper towels and see if its the same.Accept or reject the hypothesis: If your hypothesis was that all brands of paper towels are equal, yet your data indicates they picked up different volumes of water, you would reject the hypothesis. Rejecting a hypothesis doesnt mean the science was bad. On the contrary, you can tell more from a rejected hypothesis than an accepted one.Propose a new hypothesis: If you rejected your hypothesis, you can form a new one to test. In other cases, your initial experiment might raise other questions to explore. A Note About Lab Safety Whether you conduct projects in your kitchen or a formal laboratory, keep safety first and foremost in your mind. Always read the instructions and warning labels on chemicals, even common kitchen and cleaning products. In particular, note whether there are restrictions about which chemicals can be stored together and what hazards are associated with the ingredients. Note whether or not a product is toxic or poses a hazard if it is inhaled, ingested, or touches skin.Prepare for an accident before one happens. Know the location of the fire extinguisher and how to use it. Know what to do if you break glassware, accidentally injure yourself, or spill a chemical.Dress appropriately for science. Some projects in this list require no special protective gear. Others are best performed with safety googles, gloves, a lab coat (or old shirt), long pants, and covered shoes.Dont eat or drink around your projects. Many science projects involve materials you dont want to ingest. Also, if youre snacking, youre distracted. Keep your focus on your project.Dont play mad scientist. Young children may think chemistr y is about mixing together chemicals and seeing what happens or that biology involves testing the reactions of animals to different situations. This is not science. Good science is like good cooking. Start by following a protocol to the letter. Once you understand the basic principles, you can expand your experiment in new directions following the principles of the scientific method. A Final Word About Science Projects From each project, youll find links to explore many other science activities. Use these projects as a starting point to ignite interest in science and learn more about a subject. But, dont feel like you need written instructions to continue your exploration of science! You can apply the scientific method to ask and answer any question or explore solutions to any problem. When faced with a question, ask yourself if you can predict an answer and test whether or not it is valid. When you have a problem, use science to logically explore the cause and effect of any action you might take. Before you know it, youll be a scientist.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Case Analysis Matter Of Alan Simpson - 3440 Words

MEMORANDUM TO: Professor Howard FROM: Eric Schiffhauer RE: Matter of Alan Simpson DATE: November 30, 2014  ¬Ã‚ ¬Ã‚ ¬Ã‚ ¬Ã‚ ¬Ã‚ ¬Ã‚ ¬Ã‚ ¬_____________________________________________________________________________ ¬Ã‚ ¬Ã‚ ¬Ã‚ ¬_ QUESTION PRESENTED 1) Under California state law, can Alan Simpson (hereinafter called â€Å"Mr. Simpson†), a non-adopted minor living in the home of decedent Rebecca Sweeney (hereinafter called â€Å"Mrs. Sweeney†) at time of her death, recover from the estate of Mrs. Sweeney as a lawful heir. BRIEF ANSWER 1) Yes. While there is a statue, California Probate Code  §6454, regarding foster children’s ability to heir in California, California Probate Code  §6455 states, â€Å"Nothing in this chapter affects or limits application of the judicial doctrine of equitable adoption for the benefit of the child or the child s issue.† Cal. Prob. Code  § 6455 (West 2014). Under California case law one can inherit under the doctrine of equitable adoption if (1) the person(s) were treated and accepted as a natural child, and (2) if adoption was contemplated or promised but never obtained. Estate of Ford, 82 P.3d 747 (Cal. 2004), 752. Here, the facts show Mr. Simpson was treated as a natural child by Mrs. Sweeney during both of their shared lifetimes. The facts also state, Mrs. Sweeney also told Mr. Simpson on numerous occasions she wanted to adopt him; in addition, Mrs. Sweeney also told other members of her family that she wanted to adopt Mr. Simpson. Simpson interview, pg 4. Beca use both elements are metShow MoreRelated The Implications of DNA Profiling Essay3166 Words   |  13 Pagesprivate laboratories are utilized. Formerly used only in research labs, DNA fingerprinting has recently made headlines in the media due to the spectacle of the O.J. Simpson murder trial, where DNA tests played a crucial role. While DNA profiling is being used more and more to help convict as well as exonerate potential suspects in criminal cases, the jury is still out in terms of the role DNA will eventually play in the legal system. The broad ramifications of DNA fingerprinting, especially concerns overRead MoreO.J. Simpson Not Guilty4438 Words   |  18 PagesTo: Dr. Sirleaf From: Vinita Dixon Topic: Why O.J. Simpson was found not guilty May 12, 2010 Strayer University The double homicide trial of O.J. Simpson may be over but the speculation of how and why he was found not guilty is still running sky high. Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman were stabbed to death outside her Brentwood townhouse on June 12 1994. Former American football star O.J. Simpson was arrested soon after the killings but insisted from the start he was absolutelyRead MoreMarketing Literature Review11908 Words   |  48 PagesRoutinized response, Brand loyal, Switchers, Pure variety seeking, Statistical analysis, Implications.] 4 The Impact of Affect on Memory of Advertising. Tim Ambler and Tom Burne, Journal of Advertising Research, 39 (March/April 1999), pp. 25–34. [Literature review, Model testing, Hypotheses, Experiment, Brain locations, Recognition and recall, Propranolol, Placebos, Assessment, Managerial implications.] 5 A Multivariate Analysis of Web Usage. Pradeep K. Korgaonkar and Lori D. Wolin, Journal of AdvertisingRead MoreExam Paper7169 Word s   |  29 Pagespersonality d. risk-taking e. Narcissism (b; Easy; Machiavellianism; p. 112) {AACSB: Analytic Skills} 18. Which of the following would be the statement most likely made by an individual high in Machiavellianism? a. â€Å"It does not matter so much whether I am right or wrong, as long as I am the center of attention.† b. â€Å"I do what I think needs to be done. I don’t need someone else to tell me what is right.† c. â€Å"I’ll do whatever I have to do to get ahead.† d. †I’llRead MoreLanguage Attitudes8272 Words   |  34 Pagescultures: the colonizers wanted to introduce European literature to the natives, at the same time remaining ignorant of their indigenous literatures), to gain economic advantage, to control domains of knowledge and information, and for deception. As Simpson (1985) cited, in using English language for social purpose, there is always a marked tendency to prefer those words that are less offensive to the sensibilities. And so, people come to regard one word as more desirable than another. Teaching EnglishRead MoreThe Starbucks Brandscape and Consumers10413 Words   |  42 PagesFor proponents of tbe homogenization thesis, global brands are Trojan horses through which transnational corporations colonize local cultures (e.g., Falk 1999; Ritzer 1993). In recent years, anthropological studies have built a strong empirical case that, contrary to the homogenization thesis, consumers often appropriate the meanings of global brands to their own ends, creatively adding new cultural associations, dropping incompatible ones, and transforming others to fit into local culturalRead MoreTalk Shows5538 Words   |  23 Pageseven a loosely defined plot structure which re-enacts itself each evening in the talk rituals that take place in front of the camera. These narratives center on the host as the central recurring character who frames and organizes the talk. Literary analysis of talk shows is relatively rare, but Michael Arlens essay on the talk show in The Camera Age, or Kenneth Tynans profile of Johnny Carson in The New Yorker, are superb examples of this approach. Talk shows can also be seen as social texts. TalkRead MoreThe Censorship of Art Essay example14698 Words   |  59 Pagesoriginally I found it interesting to look for labeled records, this has become by all standards a time-wasting activity. So many records are labeled, without any coherent standard, that one may rightly wonder what the label is all about anyway. In any case, although the PMRC’s actions have not managed to directly lead to legislation or a more strict rating system, it is clear that since the Senate Hearing the issue of the nexus between popular music, sex, violence and declining moral standards has beenRead MoreControl Theory15246 Words   |  61 Pagestheme was that it had lost a great deal of its popularity as an explanation of social problems in general and of crime in particular (Rubington Weinberg, 1971). Like the older concept of social pathology, it had come under intense criticism as a matter of vague generalities masking a lack of value neutrality. As Clinard (1957) commented: There are a number of objections to this frame of reference. (1) Disorganization is too subjective and vague a concept for analyzing a general society. . . . (2)Read MoreTop 1 Cause for Project Failure65023 Words   |  261 Pagesthis had been a private sector Programme! 1. [pic] Anish Mathai Mathew [PMP|MBA] Temenos T24 PROGRAM MANAGER at Union National Bank @Karl: Thanks for your comment and the great example. Guess in that case you d agree that LUCK (no matter how small), does play a role ;) .... [Mathew@PM4K] @ http://www.anishmathaimathew.blogspot.com 2. [pic] Nico Viergever Independent Management Consulting Professional / Trainer PRINCE2 MSP

Essay on Should English Be Official - 556 Words

Should English Be Official? United States is a nation accommodating multi-ethnic groups of almost 500000 Americans. Since 1960s, America has received an increasing number of newcomers and immigrants from all over the world. However, language communication has somehow become a latent problem, whether in economical, political, or social aspects. Although English has been the common language of America for over two hundred years, it has never become the official language. Therefore, question like Does America need an official language? has been raised and argued in recent decades. Both sides hold very strong arguments on this controversial issue. In the articles English Should Be Official by Bradley S. O Leary and Language Cements†¦show more content†¦In Saunders opinion, he believes that it is crucial to maintain the tie of common language for the unity and stability of the nation. He also adds, Our common language unites us and promotes understanding through communication (219). Another major argument is that both affirmative and negative sides bring up the money issue. OLeary insists English should be the official language otherwise the price of multilingualism will be very expensive (216). In other words, it will cost the government a great sum of money to translate numerous documents into many languages. However, contrary to OLearys viewpoint, Kamber, Rumbaut and Portes all consider that English as simply a common language but not an official language can foster the competition of economy. As Kamber says, A failure to pass English only laws would benefit all, because multilingualism will help the U.S.A to comet in the new global economy (217). Similarly, Rumbaut and Portes also regard that America will find itself more enmeshed in global economic competition if English has become the official language (218). Besides the different attitude toward common language and economy, the communication between ethnic groups and Americans is also an argument. Saunders notes, Democray, more than any other system of government, depends upon communication. Our democracy could not function if the people could not communicate with their electedShow MoreRelatedShould English Be the Official Language of the Us843 Words   |  4 PagesShould English be the Official Language in the United States Even though other countries have their own official language, not making English the official language in the U.S. will help preserve the different cultures that decide to live in the US. Communities are built based on cultures and the U. S. economy depends on other countries and their people. One of the greatest barriers today in the U.S. is the effectiveness of communication. Whether that communication is written or verbal there isRead More English Should Be the Official Language of the United States1719 Words   |  7 PagesEnglish as the official language of the United States could benefit the U.S. Government and America as a whole. America has long since been a multicultural nation and has been an English speaking nation since it was founded. The constitutional and federal documents are all in English, which furthers the American people, believing English should be our official language. The majority of states already have English as their official language, for English has always provided a much needed cohesion toRead MoreShould English Be The United States Official Language?1781 Words   |  8 PagesShould English be the United States official language? Word count: Task 2 From the time pilgrims landed in this remarkable nation at Plymouth Rock, immigrants have been culturally diverse and have spoken various languages throughout history. When pilgrims arrived in the New World, the people did not know how to communicate with the natives through intense study the natives soon learned the Pilgrim’s language, which was English. Currently the United States is conducted of differentRead More English Should be Americas Official Language Essay1749 Words   |  7 PagesEnglish Should be Americas Official Language The government implementing English as the official legal language of America is imperative because a conformity of communication within our borders is needed to unify the vast diversity. Our mighty country was founded on providing all citizens with equality including inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The United States is a progressive nation that welcomes people from far and wide to come and savor the God-givenRead More Should the United States Make English the Official language?1147 Words   |  5 Pageslanguage other than English (www.us-english.org). Language barriers, cultural differences, and immigration have been a part of life in the United States for decades. Language is considered a vital tool in the construction of someone’s identity and an expression of culture. In the last 200 years immigrants have chosen to make the United States their home, but some proceeded with caution by slowly adapting to the English language and culture . If a country doesn’t have an official language is usuallyRead MoreEssay on Should English Be the Official Language of the United States2657 Words   |  11 PagesShould English be the Official Language of the United States Name ENG 122 Instructor April 30, 2012 Should English be the Official Language of the United States The debate on whether the United States should make English the official language has been raging within the borders of the country for decades. Several bills have been presented to Congress over the years, but have stagnated due to the opposition on either side. Though there would certainly be drawbacks to introducing English asRead MoreEnglish Should Be Ficial Language Of The United States1303 Words   |  6 PagesEnglish Should be the Official Language of the U.S. Across the United States the amount of people who speak English as a second language or do not speak it at all keeps growing. This means some people could have neighbors that they cannot even ask for a cup or sugar from. There are even sections of the U.S. where immigrants have their own communities and they mostly do not speak English with each other. It is crazy how in a country whose foundation is English has portions of the population whereRead MoreEnglish Should Be Ficial Language Of The United States1303 Words   |  6 PagesEnglish Should be the Official Language of the U.S. Across the United States the amount of people who speak english as a second language or do not speak it at all keeps growing. This means some people could have neighbors that they cannot even ask for a cup or sugar from. There are even sections of the U.S. where immigrants have their own communities and they mostly do not speak english with each other. It is crazy how in a country whose foundation is english has portions of the population whereRead MoreEnglish As Ficial Language922 Words   |  4 Pagesto have English as the official language? U.S has been trying to find the answer for this question for a long time. And they still didn’t come up with an answer. Presently, there are 23 states that actually wanted to have English as the official language. And it’s still not enough. I agree that there are some benefits for having an official language but we should also consider the disadvantages that are more than advantages. In the beginning I thought that English should be the official languageRead MoreThe United States Should Have English As Ficial Language1163 Words   |  5 PagesUnited States should have English as the official language.† I am interested about this topic because surprisingly the U.S doesn’t have an official language. Many people believe that it is because almost everyone speaks it and every place requires it. When in fact it is not the official language and the U.S doesn’t even have one. I will be writing this paper as a debate of why we should and shouldn’t have an official language even though I will be more leaning to the side of having an official language

Theme of the divided self within Emily Brontes Wuthering Heights and Mary Shelleys Frankenstein Essay Example For Students

Theme of the divided self within Emily Brontes Wuthering Heights and Mary Shelleys Frankenstein Essay Thematically, the divided self is one of the most interesting themes within both novels and is of great importance to the development or ruin of the characters in both Wuthering Heights and Frankenstein. Both authors when primarily exploring this theme focus upon the physical, mental or spiritual division within certain characters. In Emily Brontes novel Wuthering Heights, the principal characters Cathy and Heathcliff are presented as needing this division within themselves to recognise their need for each other. This endurance of physical, mental and spiritual division whilst alive, allows them only tragically to experience when in death, complete entity within themselves. Primarily Cathy is not depicted as divided; instead, she is presented as belonging to a family unit, which seems to stay intact until the arrival of a gypsy brat. Although Heathcliff creates a divide within the family due to his arrival, Cathy is seen to gain a friend with whom she feels she has an affinity both physically, spiritually and mentally, which will become increasingly evident as the novel progresses. However, this alliance throughout the novel is frequently thrown into turmoil by outside influences or factors. As we are informed from the onset, the greatest punishment that could be bestowed upon Cathy was separation from Heathcliff. Cathy and Heathcliffs separation only therefore ensues as a result of their initial outing to Thrushcross Grange. Their promise to grow up together as rude as savages, is destroyed when Cathy and Heathcliff are separated physically by many factors resulting from this visitation. Just as the Lintons dog holds Cathy, so too is the Lintons house symbolically presented as separating her from Heathcliff, when Heathcliff resorts to peering in through their great glass panes to see Cathy, after being physically dragged out of Thrushcross Grange. Cathy is also depicted as physically separated from Heathcliff even when she returns to Wuthering Heights. Instead of a wild, hatless little savage with whom Heathcliff has an affinity with, she returns as a very dignified person. Heathcliff is now therefore separated physically from Cathy, not only by appearance but as he said in the previous chapter, her superiority to everybody, including him. The presentation of Cathy and Heathcliff as physically divided is not only literally seen through the differing households but also through Cathys own actions and attire. Although Thrushcross Grange is symbolically portrayed as repressing Cathy and separating her from Heathcliff, Cathy is presented as readily accepting from the Lintons, fine clothes and flattery, which would in turn distinguish her from Heathcliff when she returns. Upon her arrival, she is immediately seen as separated when she sits above everyone else upon a handsome black pony. This is emphasised further when although Cathy is joyful to return, she refrains from touching the dogs, lest they should fawn upon her splendid garments. Similarly, when Cathy encounters Heathcliff, although she runs to embrace him, she gazes concernedly at her dress, which she fears has become  embellished. Emily Bronte clearly depicts the physical state of the divided self also through Cathy and Heathcliffs marriages. Only when Cathy marries Edgar and Heathcliff marries Isabella, can we truly see the division within the self. As we see throughout the novel, Heathcliffs absence has a profound effect upon the steady decline of Catherines physical and mental state of health. Due to their separation, Catherine no longer recognises her own reflection as Heathcliff mirrored all that she represented. Dont you see that face?à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦ It was yourself Mrs Linton: You knew it a while since. The relationship between male and female in Frankenstein is also subject to division. Whereas Cathy and Heathcliff need one another to survive as a whole, Frankensteins relationship with Elizabeth cannot survive as the monster will not allow it due to Frankensteins refusal to create a female for the monster. Just as Frankenstein hoped for happiness with his marriage to Elizabeth, the monster also wishes for a companion equal to him that will, in turn, perfectionate as Elizabeth would do with Frankenstein, his weak and faulty natures. Frankensteins marriage to Elizabeth would enable him to regain his lost innocence, which was lost, due to the creation of his abhorred monster, thereby creating within Frankenstein an internal division, until this union occurs. As the monster is refused an opportunity to be free from misery, he therefore destroys his creators chance. I shall be with you on your wedding night. Just as the monster is divided due to lack of companionship, one may also see his creator suffering the same fate that has not resulted, as in Wuthering Heights from outside influences, but due to his own actions. Emily Bronte further develops Catherines state of division through where she lives, either in Wuthering Heights or Thrushcross Grange. Heathcliff and Edgar represent the extreme emotions felt by Cathy in certain parts of the novel. Both symbolise the differing households and how, when Cathy is contained within one of these environments with either Edgar or Heathcliff it has a discernible effect upon her character and future. To a certain extent, both are needed in order for Cathy to be complete. Without them she cannot survive as Heathcliff represents her sole being, hes more myself than I am, her desire for freedom again to those hills where she may return to again with her former playmate and regain what was repressed within her due to her first outing to Thrushcross Grange and from her marriage to Edgar. However, even though she is presented as divided even when they are seen as physically together, due to her superiority in social class. It would degrade me to marry Heathcliffà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦He shall never know how I love him. The importance of social class is emphasised through Cathys marriage to Edgar. Edgar represents more of the imposed order of society, the conventional and cultivated, everything that Cathy seeks to obtain. You love Mr Edgar because hes handsome, rich and loves you. She knows she can rely upon  his predictability in any situation that may arise. Although Catherine desires the passion that Heathcliff presents to her, she is at present depicted as believing Edgars docile love will save her. As Catherine cannot live within both environments, ultimately she feels restricted when she picks Edgar as her husband and chooses to move to Thrushcross Grange, as spiritually Cathy is presented as needing Heathcliff as whatever their souls are made of they are the same. Without him, Catherine considers herself a mere shadow of her former self, wishing to be a girl again, half savage. Within Mary Shelleys Frankenstein, the divisional aspect of the two principal characters, Frankenstein and the monster, rather subvert the theme of being physically divided. Mary Shelley presents this theme through her use of juxtaposition when describing both Frankenstein and the monster convulsing in the same chapter. Linguistically she reflects Frankenstein as becoming part of his creation at the moment of its birth. Just as Frankenstein describes how in his fever every limb became convulsed, so too does the monster reflect, effectively through Shelleys use of descriptive language, how when created it had a convulsive motion which agitated its limbs. As Mary Shelley presents Frankenstein and the monster as one through her comparative language, her use of syntax within the description of the monsters birth also adds emphasis to this theme. James Kelman: How Late it Was, How Late EssayThe relationship between male and female in Frankenstein is also subject to division. Whereas Cathy and Heathcliff need one another to survive as a whole, Frankensteins relationship with Elizabeth cannot survive as the monster will not allow it due to Frankensteins refusal to create a female for the monster. Just as Frankenstein hoped for happiness with his marriage to Elizabeth, the monster also wishes for a companion equal to him that will, in turn, perfectionate as Elizabeth would do with Frankenstein, his weak and faulty natures. Frankensteins marriage to Elizabeth would enable him to regain his lost innocence, which was lost, due to the creation of his abhorred monster, thereby creating within Frankenstein an internal division, until this union occurs. As the monster is refused an opportunity to be free from misery, he therefore destroys his creators chance. I shall be with you on your wedding night. Just as the monster is divided due to lack of companionship, one may also see his creator suffering the same fate that has not resulted, as in Wuthering  Heights from outside influences, but due to his own actions. Emily Bronte further develops Catherines state of division through where she lives, either in Wuthering Heights or Thrushcross Grange. Heathcliff and Edgar represent the extreme emotions felt by Cathy in certain parts of the novel. Both symbolise the differing households and how, when Cathy is contained within one of these environments with either Edgar or Heathcliff it has a discernible effect upon her character and future. To a certain extent, both are needed in order for Cathy to be complete. Without them she cannot survive as Heathcliff represents her sole being, hes more myself than I am, her desire for freedom again to those hills where she may return to again with her former playmate and regain what was repressed within her due to her first outing to Thrushcross Grange and from her marriage to Edgar. However, even though she is presented as divided even when they are seen as physically together, due to her superiority in social class. It would degrade me to marry Heathcliffà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦He shall never know how I love him. The importance of social class is emphasised through Cathys marriage to Edgar. Edgar represents more of the imposed order of society, the conventional and cultivated, everything that Cathy seeks to obtain. You love Mr Edgar because hes handsome, rich and loves you. She knows she can rely upon his predictability in any situation that may arise. Although Catherine desires the passion that Heathcliff presents to her, she is at present depicted as believing Edgars docile love will save her. As Catherine cannot live within both environments, ultimately she feels restricted when she picks Edgar as her husband and chooses to move to Thrushcross Grange, as spiritually Cathy is presented as needing Heathcliff as whatever their souls are made of they are the same. Without him, Catherine considers herself a mere shadow of her former self, wishing to be a girl again, half savage. Within Mary Shelleys Frankenstein, the divisional aspect of the two principal characters, Frankenstein and the monster, rather subvert the theme of being physically divided. Mary Shelley presents this theme through her use of juxtaposition when describing both Frankenstein and the monster convulsing in the same chapter. Linguistically she reflects Frankenstein as becoming part of his creation at the moment of its birth. Just as Frankenstein describes how in his fever every limb became convulsed, so too does the monster reflect, effectively through Shelleys use of descriptive language, how when created it had a convulsive motion which agitated its limbs. As Mary Shelley presents Frankenstein and the monster as one through her comparative language, her use of syntax within the description of the monsters birth also adds emphasis to this theme. Thematically, the divided self is once more, seen as subverted through the use of imagery instead of language. Rather than describing the actions of both Frankenstein and the monster as analogous through the use of language, Mary Shelley, through Robert Waltons encounter with Frankenstein  also thematically reinforces both characters as united through the use of imagery. Even though the reader is later informed the traveller is Frankenstein, the unique choice of imagery when describing him as an interesting creature serves only to reinforce how Frankenstein has become divided from humanity due to his unnatural creation. However, this singular image has a paradoxical effect upon Frankensteins divided self. Although one may view Frankenstein as divided, one may also regard him as united with his creature. Just as he is presented as gnashing his teeth, the monster is later seen to reflect Frankensteins actions by gnashing his teeth in the impotence of anger. Mary Shelleys use of language regarding the theme of giving birth to an embodiment of ones self clearly depicts the physical, mental and spiritual void in both Frankenstein and his creation. Just as Cathys emotions are repressed within Wuthering Heights, so too are Frankensteins. The monster himself may represent the division within Frankensteins sub conscience, his primitive self. We are unfashioned creatures, but half made up. As his creation has given birth to his other self, he is closely linked with the monsters own spiritual self. You my creator, detest and spurn meà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦to whom thou art bound by ties only dissoluble by the annihilation of one of us. Emily Bronte also successfully presents as Mary Shelley does, the theme of the divided self through her use of language. When the reader is told her mind has wandered, her soul no longer remains within her, one may view Emily Brontes description of Cathys divided self as conflicting. Although her soul is seen to escape what she likens to a shattered prison which has, like the two households similarly restricted her, this liberation also divides Cathy within herself, spiritually, mentally and physically. The monster, within Frankenstein is also subjected to spiritual division. His perception of life is based upon experience. Through his involvement with the cottagers he instinctively learns to assist their labours, thus developing a sense of humanity. This instinctive good side is destroyed however when the cottagers reject him and with a bitter sickness the monster therefore learns how he will treat Frankenstein in return, thus destroying his sense of humanity, forever dividing him until his death. Within both novels, the theme of the divided self is an experience, which each protagonist character is seen to endure. Until they tragically accept their destiny, Cathy, Heathcliff, Frankenstein and the monster are presented as physically, spiritually and mentally divided, not only within themselves but also with each other. Only when they finally succumb to death, are the dead at peace, leaving the reader to ponder upon the rhetorical question which touches upon the theme of the divided self; for where can I find rest but in death?